The Knights of Columbus present Men of Worth at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 15 at Monsignor Moran Hall in Susanville. Proceeds from the concert benefit the Knights of Columbus scholarship program. Men of Worth (Donnie Macdonald, left, of Scotland, and James Keigher, or Ireland) play traditional and contemporary Scottish and Irish music on a variety of instruments including accordion, tenor banjo, bodhran, concertina, guitar, mandolin, mandocello and octave mandolin. Advance tickets are available at Margie’s Book Nook. For more information, call 249-0222.

Celtic duo, Men of Worth, return to Susanville

If you’re into folk music in general and Celtic folk music in particular, you certainly won’t want to miss a Susanville appearance by international touring act Men of Worth at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 15 at Monsignor Moran Hall.

Proceeds from the concert benefit the Knights of Columbus scholarship program.

Men of Worth — Donnie Macdonald,, a native of Scotland, and James Keigher, a native of Ireland — have been performing as Men of Worth since 1986. They made their first appearance in Lassen County in Herlong in 2002, and they’re returned to Susanville several times since then, usually around St. Patrick’s Day, appearing at Lassen Community College and the Veterans Memorial Hall.

According to their website, menofworth.com, they “blend their voices with harmony and support their collection of songs with their varied selection of instruments. They have a very simple approach to their presentation, and in keeping with tradition, remain true to the music and story. Their show is a unique combination of humor, exciting tunes, and soulful, heartfelt ballads.”

Keigher said Men of Worth always enjoy playing in Susanville when they’re out on tour.

‘It’s a favorite of ours,” Keigher said. We’ve always enjoyed it, so we’re glad to be coming back … It’s been a while since we’ve played in Susanville, so we’re delighted to come back, for sure.”

Keigher said he wasn’t sure why the music of Scotland and Ireland can be so popular among folk music buffs, but he said, “The music’s good. People can relate to folk music. They can understand it.”

And then he noted there are something like 50 million people of Irish descent living in America, and “somewhere along the lines they’ve all got connections to Scottish and Irish music.”

And then Keigher noted there are the fads over the years such as River Dance which bring Celtic music and culture into the popular consciousness.

Keigher said St. Patrick’s Day in America always seems to spark a bit more interest in Irish music even though our celebration is an American thing that’s becoming more and more popular in his homeland.

Advance tickets are available at Margie’s Book Nook. For more information, call 249-0222.