California awards $1 billion for walking and biking projects in disadvantaged dommunities; invests $878 million for transportation infrastructure

The California Transportation Commission this week approved $1 billion for 93 new walking and biking projects for disadvantaged communities as part of the 2023 Active Transportation Program and allocated nearly $878 million for projects to repair and improve transportation infrastructure throughout the state — including a project in Susanville. The allocation includes more than $209 million in funding from the federal Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act of 2021 and more than $339 million in funding from Senate Bill  1, the Road Repair and Accountability Act of 2017.

The active transportation projects approved at the meeting will benefit disadvantaged communities throughout California, two-thirds of which will implement safe routes for children to walk or bike to school. The projects make up more than half of the 2023 Active Transportation Program, with an additional $700 million to be awarded in the spring. Much of the funding comes from a one-time infusion of $1 billion for active transportation in the 2022-23 state budget as part of a nearly $15 billion transportation infrastructure package.

“California and our federal partners are continuing to make historic headway in addressing our transportation needs and advancing safety, equity, climate action and economic prosperity,” said Caltrans Director Tony Tavares. “Importantly, this includes significant investments in infrastructure that allows everyone to access active means of transportation, like walking and biking.”

Active transportation projects approved at the meeting include:
Riverside Drive Pedestrian and Bike Trail Project in Susanville: This project includes $2.8M in ATP funding.

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Butte Street Boogie Network Project in Redding: This project includes $6.4M in ATP funding.

Surprise Valley School Safety and Community Connectivity Project in Modoc County: This project includes $3M in ATP funding

Victor Improvement Project in Redding: This project includes $7.9M in ATP funding

The $878 million in projects the CTC approved include:
Highway 139 Susanville Paving Project (near Susanville, from north of Chestnut Street to 2.7 miles south of Horse Lake Road): Rehabilitate pavement, upgrade guardrail and concrete barrier, pave Maintenance Vehicle Pullouts (MVPs) and chain area, rehabilitate drainage systems, upgrade facilities to meet ADA standards and widen shoulders to provide multi-modal connectivity as complete streets elements.

Red Bluff Bridges Project (In Red Bluff, at East Sand Slough Bridge, Samson Slough Bridge and Paynes Creek Slough Bridge): Seismic retrofit of three bridges.

Big Springs Road – Phase 1 Project (In Siskiyou County near Weed on Big Springs Road from Highway 97 northerly 4.13 miles): Rehabilitate roadway. This project includes $3.53M in IIJA funding.

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Jewett Creek Bridge at Kirkwood Road Project (Near Corning, on Kirkwood Rd): Replace 1925 functional obsolete bridge.

Dixie Fire South Project (Near Pulga and Quincy, from Rock Creek Powerhouse Overcrossing to Fairgrounds Road in Plumas County): Replace existing large diameter culverts, install headwalls, rebuild downstream embankment, repair pavement, install guardrail, and place rock slope protection.

SB 1 provides $5 billion in transportation funding annually that is shared equally between the state and local agencies. Road projects progress through construction phases more quickly based on the availability of SB 1 funds, including projects that are partially funded by SB 1. For more information about transportation projects funded by SB 1, visit RebuildingCA.ca.gov.