LNF implements Hog and Sheep Area Closure Order

The Lassen National Forest implements Forest Order No. 06-21-02 within the LNF by closing areas burned during the Hog Fire and the Sheep Fire. The purpose of this Order is to provide for public safety. The Order will be in effect from May 26, through December 31. There is the potential of lifting this Order earlier, contingent on the fire season and other dynamics. This Order will prohibit being in specific areas within the Hog and Sheep Closure Boundaries.

The Hog Closure Area boundary begins in Township 30N Range IOE at the northwest comer of section 35, then continues south along the section border to its intersection with the northeast comer of Section 14, then continues east along the section border to its intersection with the LNF boundary, then continues northwest along the National Forest boundary back to the starting point.

The Sheep Closure Area boundary begins in Township 28N Range I0E at the northeast comer of section 1, then continues south along the section border to its intersection with the boundary of the Lassen and Plumas National Forests, then continues northeast along the National Forest boundary to its intersection with the Forest Road No. 28N02A, then continues northwest along Forest Road No. 28N02A to its intersection with the National Forest boundary in section 6, then continues west along the National Forest boundary back to the starting point.

“The Hog and Sheep Fires were catastrophic to the environment. Many of the trees in this area were killed, and their structural integrity has been compromised,” said Mandi Musachia, Acting Forest Supervisor, LNF. “Closing these areas to the public is necessary until the Forest Service can complete the necessary tree hazard analysis and remove the trees which lack structural integrity.”

During regular fire seasons, the Forest Service can evaluate hazardous trees in the area shortly after the fire. Unfortunately, the unprecedented fire season has created an unmanageable workload for silviculturists. The Forest is still in the process of identifying and removing hazardous trees. These trees create a falling hazard to the public and employees. Recent wind events and coming storms will only compound this problem, causing greater danger.