Tuesday, May 3, 2005 • House protects youth, parents’ rights passes child interstate abortion notification act

Publisher’s note: This story originally appeared in the Tuesday, May 3, 2005 edition of the Lassen County Times.

House Republican Conference Secretary John T. Doolittle said the House acted in the best interest of America’s youth by passing legislation that makes it a federal offense to knowingly transport a minor across state lines in an effort to circumvent a state’s abortion parental consent laws. The Child Interstate Abortion Notification Act passed the House 270 to 157.

“In our country, 23 states have laws that require  parental notification or parental consent prior to a minor receiving an abortion,” Doolittle said. “Unfortunately, these laws are often thwarted by transporting minors across state lines. In order to discourage the abuse of state notification laws and in an effort to protect our youth, this bill would make it illegal to take a minor across state lines in an effort to circumvent a state’s abortion parental consent laws.

“Unless we stop the erosion of parental rights, we will not be able to adequately protect our youth. Congress must continue to uphold the family hierarchy by giving parents the tools to protect and defend their family. This bill underscores parents’ rights and gives young girls the support system they need to work through a difficult time,” Doolittle concluded.

The Child Interstate Abortion Notification Act makes it illegal to transport a minor across state lines for an abortion in order to avoid parental notification laws. If a minor does cross state lines or an abortion, this bill also requires that physicians practicing in states without parental involvement laws notify a parent or guardian 24 hours before the abortion is performed. Violating either provision would be a federal crime subject to a $100,000 fine, one year in jail, or both.

The House has passed three similar bills since 1998 but all three died in the Senate.